Articles

Meatpaper Ten

Why No One Wants to Eat the Meat House: The complicated world of meatchitecture

January, 2010

interview by Heather Smith This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Ten. DREAMS  OF  GINGERBREAD  HOUSES and chocolate palaces are a dime a dozen. Fantasies of living in a pork chop: less so. Which is why the In Vitro Meat House, though it looks like a yam with surgical tubing stuck in it, is worth a closer look. Mitchell Joachim, founder [...]


Kirlian Photography: An artist searches for meat auras

January, 2010

images and text by Nate Larson This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Ten. THE KIRLIAN PHOTOGRAPHIC PROCESS electrifies an object to produce a contact image on photographic film or paper. The photosensitized material records the multicolored emanations produced by the high voltage passing through the object. The Russian inventor Semyon Kirlian discovered and popularized the phenomenon in 1939, although it was the [...]


The New School of Haute Perfume A contemporary perfumer’s uncommon scents

January, 2010

story by Lucas Crawford and Carmen Ellison illustration by Katherine Streeter This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Ten. IN HIS SMALL BROOKLYN GALLERY, independent perfumer Christopher Brosius takes the production of scents neither lightly nor as a matter of elitist fashion. Lining his shop, CB I Hate Perfume, are hundreds of small opaque brown bottles adorned with handwritten [...]


Notes Toward a Definitive Treatise on the Role of Meat in Popular Music with Special Consideration of Rock ’n’ Roll

January, 2010

Preliminary comments, thoughts, and insights text by Tony Michels art direction and design by Pace Kaminsky photo by Noe Dewitt This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Ten. Click image above to view full photograph. WHAT DOES MEAT TELL US  about popular music? Professor Mendl Shochat-Fresser, the acclaimed Frankfurt School philosopher, raised this important question in his controversial 1928 lecture, [...]


The Rabbitry and the Family: Bunnies may be the food of the future

January, 2010

interview by Marissa Guggiana photos by Julio Duffoo This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Ten MYRIAM AND MARK PASTERNAK raise pigs, wine grapes, rabbits, and horses at their farm, Devil’s Gulch Ranch, in Northern California. Mark bought the steeply hilled ranch in 1971 with his earnings from working in a record store. Meatpaper homed in on their rabbitry. [...]


Meatpaper Eleven

How Much for That Tê Tê? Vietnam’s illegal pangolin trade

April, 2010

story by Mike Ives illustration by Cy De Groat This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Eleven. THE OTHER NIGHT,  I left my Hanoi apartment and walked around the corner. Eateries in my neighborhood cater to middle-class Vietnamese patrons. English signs hype pizza, sushi, Tex-Mex, free Wi-Fi and pricey local specialities like cha ca — grilled fish with dill, peanuts, and sticky [...]


Mr. Oyster Goes to Washington: How an estuary became a battleground between agriculture and wilderness

April, 2010

interview by Marissa Guggiana photo by Julio Duffoo This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Eleven. Photo (Above): Drake’s Estero, Point Reyes National Seashore by Julio Duffoo. Kevin and Nancy Lunny are third-generation cattle ranchers who decided to buy their neighbors’ oyster farm when the neighbors retired. The farm is in Point Reyes National Seashore and their landlords have become [...]


The Global Tacoshed: Do you know where your taco comes from?

April, 2010

story and graphics by John Bela, Teresa Aguilera,  Annelise Aldrich & Rachael Yu This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Eleven. Click on the images below to view full diagrams: LAST FALL, a group of California College of the Arts architecture students, led by CCA architecture faculty David Fletcher (Fletcher Studio) and John Bela (Rebar), shared a meal together at [...]


Eating the Thing That Sings: A rough guide to music about plucking

April, 2010

by Heather Smith YOU MAY FIND YOURSELF  humming it occasionally. You probably know at least a few of the words. What you haven’t realized is that this most recognizable and hummable French ditty is actually a folksong about plucking the feathers from a dead songbird. Why would you? It’s in French. The origins of Alouette are shrouded in mystery and ethnomusicological dispute. [...]


The Fish Taco Farm: An experiment in urban aquaponics

April, 2010

story by Heather Smith diagram by Materials & Applications This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Eleven. Click the thumbnail below to view full diagram:   WHAT DOES IT MEAN to try and grow your own fish tacos in an outdoor exhibition space? It means a new kind of farming: one based on experimentation instead of economic [...]


Another Meatless Monday: The fight to bring variety to Baltimore school lunches

April, 2010

story by Eliza Barclay illustration by Katherine Streeter This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Eleven. ONE SQUALLY MONDAY THIS FALL, I drove across Baltimore, past hundreds of brick rowhouses, some buttressed by postage-stamp-sized front lawns, to a pre- K-through-eighth-grade school on the west side. I wanted to find out what students at the school had to say about the new weekly [...]


Meatpaper Twelve

Snap, Crackle, Pop! On Eating Bugs and Worms

July, 2010

story by Lucy Lean illustration by Andrea Wan This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Twelve. “Delectable wax moth larvae…” the flyer read. The event was called Eat Bug Eat, and was hosted by a group called the Critter Salon. It made me curious. I love  sucking the heads off of shrimp, one of the insect world’s many crustacean [...]


Wild Game at the Winery: In praise of guinea fowl

July, 2010

story by Andrew Mariani and Chris Fischer photos by Lucy Goodheart This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Twelve. AT SCRIBE WINERY IN SONOMA, CALIFORNIA, vintner Andrew Mariani and farmer/chef Chris Fischer raise guinea fowl for their table. Here, they interview each other in an attempt to explain why they chose the notoriously feisty birds for their new farm.  Fischer: [...]


Animal Science: A visit to the UC Davis Meat Laboratory

July, 2010

story and photography by Malia Wollan This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Twelve. AT THIS SLAUGHTERHOUSE, meat isn’t really the point. Here, human appetites for marbled steak, say, or buttery bacon are subordinate to the tastes and needs of mosquitoes, biotech experiments, vampire bats, cancer research, and forensic entomologists.  Here, meat is a by-product of science. Caleb Sehnert is [...]


Ariyana Suvarnasuddhi’s Holy Hamburger Series

July, 2010

This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Twelve. I started craving cheeseburgers while I was studying printmaking in Japan. Although I could find cheeseburgers in Japan, their reasonable, healthy proportions could not live up to my American-sized appetite. During that period, hamburger imagery began showing up in my artwork. I call the series — which includes the [...]


Same Old, Same Old: Cooking 100 burgers a day

July, 2010

interview by Heather Smith photos by Julio Duffoo This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Twelve. THE BURGER JOINT as we know it annihilates space. Great leaps in highway and aviation infrastructure in the 1950s propelled us across the country and around the world. What no infrastructure could take away was that suspicious feeling that can appear in [...]


Meatpaper Thirteen

When Backyard Chickens Become Pets: The growing geriatric chicken population

October, 2010

story by Kasandra Griffin photo by Jessica Niello This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Thirteen. JAMIE REA HAS HAD A ROUGH CHICKEN YEAR. First, the 40-something Portland native found one of her hens disemboweled by marauding raccoons. Then a replacement hen died in a heat wave, and a second replacement “hen” had to be renamed and relocated to a nearby [...]


The Bunnies of Wartime: A World War II-era DIY meat manual resurfaces

October, 2010

book review by Novella Carpenter This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Thirteen. KEEPING POULTRY AND RABBITS ON SCRAPS is a small, conveniently pocket-sized paperback, with thick bands of green running along the top and bottom, and a single illustration of a dancing penguin. The penguin is dancing, one surmises, because there are no instructions for how to raise and kill its [...]


Meat in America: Turning offal into energy, and other aspects of small-town butchery in northern Vermont

October, 2010

interview by Maria Gould This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Thirteen. THIS IS THE FOURTH in an ongoing series of interviews about how Americans buy and consume meat. In this installment, Meatpaper checks in with Phil Brown, owner of Vermont Rabbitry and Custom Meat Processing in Glover, Vermont (pop. 966). Here, Phil discusses the pleasures and challenges of running a small [...]


There’s No Such Thing as a Bad Cut

October, 2010

An excerpt from Primal Cuts: Cooking with America’s Best Butchers interview by Marissa Guggiana photo by Julio Duffoo This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Thirteen.   Sonoma Direct is a USDA-inspected meat plant in Petaluma, California. My family purchased it in 2005, and I have been running it since then. Slowly, I developed relationships with local food producers. [...]


Holy Sandwich! Edible architecture and the Renaissance section

October, 2010

by Nicholas de Monchaux This article originally appeared in SANDWICH, a supplement to Meatpaper Issue Thirteen.  Fig.1 IN HIS SURVEY of Renaissance architecture, Architectural Principles in the Age of Humanism, Rudolf Wittkower uses the buildings of Leon Batista Alberti and Andrea Palladio to advance what has become an enormously influential argument about the relationship between a building’s plan, section, and proportion. As [...]


Saigon Sandwich: Vietnam’s crunchy cross-cultural creation

October, 2010

Story by Julie Wan Photos by Chloe Aftel This article originally appeared in SANDWICH, a supplement to Meatpaper Issue Thirteen. IT WAS SIX YEARS AGO, but I still clearly remember the first time I tasted banh mi, the internationally popular Vietnamese sandwich. My cousin and I had bought the pork-liver pâté filling from a market in Ho Chi Minh [...]


He’s Got the Whole World In His Bread: The Earth Sandwich

October, 2010

story by Marissa Guggiana illustration by Emily l. Eibel This article originally appeared in SANDWICH, a supplement to Meatpaper Issue Thirteen. THE CONCEPT IS SIMPLE: locate the spot directly across the planet from you, find someone there, and then both place a piece of bread down on the ground, sandwiching the world. It’s the execution that’s difficult. A little investigation quickly [...]


A Noble Snack: How the sandwich got its name

October, 2010

interview by Malia Wollan This article originally appeared in SANDWICH, a supplement to Meatpaper Issue Thirteen. JOHN MONTAGU IS LORD SANDWICH. The 67-year-old is the 11th Earl of Sandwich and a member of the British House of Lords. Sandwiches as we know them were named after his great-great-great-great-great-great-grandfather, the 4th Earl of Sandwich, also named John Montagu.  The Sandwiches are now [...]


Gun, with Sandwich: The Internet horde decodes Radiohead

July, 2010

story by Toby Warner illustration by Katherine Streeter This article originally appeared in SANDWICH, a supplement to Meatpaper Issue Thirteen. “YOU WANT ME?” WAILS THOM YORKE. “Fucking well come  and find me / I’ll be waiting / With a gun and a pack of sandwiches.” And then the question that comes to everyone’s mind: Sandwiches? The Radiohead song [...]


The Sandwich That Changed My Life: True stories from Meatpaper readers

July, 2010

This article originally appeared in SANDWICH, a supplement to Meatpaper Issue Thirteen. Upon going through reader-submitted essays on the topic of “The Sandwich That Changed My Life,” we never expected that the most compelling would be so heavy on (a) love and (b) pastrami. In the same way that people say you never really know a person until you fight them, perhaps [...]


Meatpaper Seventeen

Hot Dog. Beefcake. An etymology of meat words

March, 2012

story by Malia Wollan illustration by Holly Mulder-Wollan This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Seventeen.  Beefcake n. slang, originated in the United States. (a) photographs or motion pictures of partially clad muscular men; (b) a display of sturdy masculine physique. The first printed instance of the word occurred in 1949 in American Speech, a [...]


Crab Man: A few hours on the Sea Fox

March, 2012

interview by Heather Smith photos by Julio Duffoo This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Seventeen.  IT TAKES A DETERMINED PERSON a while to find Ron Ashwin. In the heart of the bustling T-shirt shops, trinketariums, and behemoth seafood eateries that make up San Francisco’s Fisherman’s Wharf, there is an alley. That alley leads to [...]


Meatpaper Eighteen

A Fish and Bread Journey: The natural and social history of bagels and lox

July, 2012

story by Heather Smith tintypes by Michael Shindler / Photobooth This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Eighteen. THE SALMON TRAVELED THE FARTHEST. Its oldest known ancestor in the genus Salmonidae swam through the waters of the Eocene, back when Australia was still a part of Antarctica, North America was still a part of Europe, and India was just beginning its [...]


Meat Up: Kitchen Stories

July, 2012

illustration by Cy de Groat This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Eighteen  HERE AT MEATPAPER, we’ve always been interested in the relationship between taste and memory. For this installment of “Meat Up,” we requested stories about the powerful memories that specific meaty flavors evoke, and the recipes associated with those flavors. Our inbox was inundated with nostalgia: sense memories of grandparents and [...]


Gravy Train. Jerky. An etymology of meat words

July, 2012

story by Malia Wollan illustrations by Holly Mulder-Wollan This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Eighteen.  GRAVY TRAIN: noun, slang, originated in the United States. Gravy is an example of what linguists call a “ghost word,” or a word that originates in an error. In this case, it seems that sometime in the 14th century, a recipe [...]


Meatpaper Nineteen

Mortal Coil

December, 2012

by Galen Rogers photos by Joe Edgar A web-only supplement to Meatpaper Issue 19, the Fishue After three months of living and apprenticing with a musician in Bamako, Mali, my American friend Joe and I ventured out of the dry country, our sights set on the Ghanaian coast, dreaming of the Atlantic. A trip that [...]


Food and Light: The uses of whale

December, 2012

story by Heather Smith illustration by Yutaka Houlette This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Nineteen. IN 2011, JAPAN KILLED 266 MINKE WHALES and one fin whale during hunting season in the Antarctic. It had hoped for 900, but whaling boats were followed by antiwhaling boats. The antiwhaling boats threw ropes into the whaling boats’ propellers. The whaling boats shot at [...]


The Cliff: A tale of night smelt

December, 2012

story by Kirk Lombard illustration by Gideon Chase This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Nineteen   I SUPPOSE IT WAS INEVITABLE that someone who spends as much time fishing in, and pontificating about, the ocean as I do would begin to grow weary of it. But over time I began to see it not as the benign, uncaring (if [...]


From Boat to Table: Talking about seafood sustainability with Kenny Belov

December, 2012

interview by Viola Tontolo photo by Julio Duffoo This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Nineteen   SINCE WE STARTED WORKING ON THE FISHUE, one name has continually come up in conversation. All the roads of sustainable seafood in the San Francisco Bay Area, it seems, lead to Kenny Belov. Belov was born Innokenty Belov in Moscow, Russia, [...]


If I Were a Limpet: Isabella Rosellini’s Green Pornos

December, 2012

interview by Sasha Wizansky photography by Jody Shapiro This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Nineteen. IT’S NOT HARD TO FEEL DIFFERENTLY about whales after seeing Isabella Rossellini dressed as a male whale in a paper costume, penetrating a female whale puppet with a six-foot-long paper penis. In 2008, Rossellini began a series of Web films for the Sundance Channel called “Green [...]


One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Fake Fish: Selling snapper in the United States

December, 2012

by Maria Gould This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Nineteen.   What do Nile tilapia, white bass, and Pacific Ocean perch all have in common? All three fish have been used to simulate the look, feel, and taste of red snapper. One of the most commonly counterfeited fish, red snapper is notorious for not [...]


Are Salmon Salmon? An inquiry into color and aquaculture

December, 2012

by Maria Gould illustration by Jessica Niello This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Nineteen.   Salmon legs were everywhere this year. Bright colors dominated clothing retailers’ new lines, and pink-hued pants were especially popular among shoppers. The sartorial trend led this writer to wonder: Do other fish colors end up in fashion? What is [...]


The Most Pristine Ocean: Monitoring fishing effects on the Ross Sea foodweb

December, 2012

story by Grant Ballard photo by Viola Toniolo This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Nineteen   THE CLIMB TO THE TOP of Pat’s Peak from the four-person U.S. Antarctic Program hut at Cape Crozier takes a fit person about 15 minutes, and a bit of motivation, particularly after dinner. It is a solitary, aggravating (due to loose talus), and [...]


Many Fish Are Named After Other Animals

December, 2012

illustrations by Marie Assenat   MARIE ASSÉNAT is a French illustrator who lives and works in Brooklyn. Her playful style is inspired by nature, animals, and moments from her childhood. See more of her work at marieassenat.com. This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Nineteen.


Meatpaper Eight

Song of Cracklin

June, 2009

poem by Kevin Young illustration by Sasha Wizansky This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Eight. Little heaven, marked man, I’ve seen you turn a bag see-through Then escape— Homemade Houdini God of grease & heartburn You test me & my nerve. Salt-junkie, you’re Russian Roulette— delicious as death— God of grief & heartattack Hourglass we hope [...]


The Lonesome Call of the Animal Fluffer: Everything you always wanted to know about cattle insemination but were afraid to ask

June, 2009

by Marissa Guggiana illustration by Elizabeth Zechel This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Eight. AS WITH EVERY LOVE STORY, there are parallel narratives at work. The first is that of the bull. He  is the 1% cream resting majestically atop the 99%  crop. His ancestors were selected primarily for their God-given efficiency at turning grass and grains [...]


So Fresh the Heart is Still Beating: Eating and hunting with the Kangiqsujuaq

June, 2009

story and photos by Justin Nobel This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Eight.     “Eskimos eat everything raw….so there is no cuisine. To have cuisine you must cook.” — Paul Bocuse, after a culinary expedition from France to Nunavik, an Inuit territory in Arctic Quebec TIIVI WORE MUCK BOOTS, grease-stained pants, and a hunting cap. Lashed [...]


Meatpaper Nine

All Is Fair in Pie and War: The lard vs. butter debate comes to a climax

October, 2010

story by Colleen Hubbard illustration by Elizabeth Zechel This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Nine. IT IS NE ARLY 7 P.M., and the baby wants her meat. Tonight on the menu it’s late-summer peach pie two ways: one with an all-butter crust, the other half lard. At the kitchen counter, I’m knuckle-deep in grated lard; warmth from the nearby oven [...]


What’s in a Name: Temple Grandin and the Ethics of Certifiable Meat

October, 2010

by Heather Smith This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Nine. THE APPROPRIATE WAY TO KILL AN ANIMAL IS to first bind its limbs, and second, pull the heart out of its chest. So says the Yassa, the code of law devised by Genghis Kahn. The appropriate way to kill a mouse for a taxidermy project is to use [...]


Grace and Grit: A young veterinarian does his part for the American food system

October, 2009

interview by Marissa Guggiana photos by Julio Duffoo This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Nine. GRANT MILLER IS A LARGE-ANIMAL VETERINARIAN in Petaluma, California. Meatpaper spoke with him about caring for the animals that feed us. He treats livestock on both traditional and boutique ranches to maintain health in a ranching system that is making room for organics, a younger generation, [...]


Holiday at the Abbatoir: The rise and fall of slaughterhouse tourism in America

September, 2009

Story by Heather Smith This article originally appeared in Meatpaper Issue Nine. WHEN THE BRITISH AUTHOR RUDYARD KIPLING visited America in 1899, he went to Yosemite. Then he went to Yellowstone. Then he went to a slaughterhouse. “They say every Englishman goes to the Chicago stock-yards,” Kipling wrote. “Once he sees it he will not soon forget it.” [...]


Meatpaper

Holy Sandwich! Edible architecture and the Renaissance section

October, 2010

by Nicholas de Monchaux This article originally appeared in SANDWICH, a supplement to Meatpaper Issue Thirteen.  Fig.1 IN HIS SURVEY of Renaissance architecture, Architectural Principles in the Age of Humanism, Rudolf Wittkower uses the buildings of Leon Batista Alberti and Andrea Palladio to advance what has become an enormously influential argument about the relationship between a building’s plan, section, and proportion. As [...]


Saigon Sandwich: Vietnam’s crunchy cross-cultural creation

October, 2010

Story by Julie Wan Photos by Chloe Aftel This article originally appeared in SANDWICH, a supplement to Meatpaper Issue Thirteen. IT WAS SIX YEARS AGO, but I still clearly remember the first time I tasted banh mi, the internationally popular Vietnamese sandwich. My cousin and I had bought the pork-liver pâté filling from a market in Ho Chi Minh [...]


He’s Got the Whole World In His Bread: The Earth Sandwich

October, 2010

story by Marissa Guggiana illustration by Emily l. Eibel This article originally appeared in SANDWICH, a supplement to Meatpaper Issue Thirteen. THE CONCEPT IS SIMPLE: locate the spot directly across the planet from you, find someone there, and then both place a piece of bread down on the ground, sandwiching the world. It’s the execution that’s difficult. A little investigation quickly [...]


A Noble Snack: How the sandwich got its name

October, 2010

interview by Malia Wollan This article originally appeared in SANDWICH, a supplement to Meatpaper Issue Thirteen. JOHN MONTAGU IS LORD SANDWICH. The 67-year-old is the 11th Earl of Sandwich and a member of the British House of Lords. Sandwiches as we know them were named after his great-great-great-great-great-great-grandfather, the 4th Earl of Sandwich, also named John Montagu.  The Sandwiches are now [...]


Gun, with Sandwich: The Internet horde decodes Radiohead

July, 2010

story by Toby Warner illustration by Katherine Streeter This article originally appeared in SANDWICH, a supplement to Meatpaper Issue Thirteen. “YOU WANT ME?” WAILS THOM YORKE. “Fucking well come  and find me / I’ll be waiting / With a gun and a pack of sandwiches.” And then the question that comes to everyone’s mind: Sandwiches? The Radiohead song [...]


The Sandwich That Changed My Life: True stories from Meatpaper readers

July, 2010

This article originally appeared in SANDWICH, a supplement to Meatpaper Issue Thirteen. Upon going through reader-submitted essays on the topic of “The Sandwich That Changed My Life,” we never expected that the most compelling would be so heavy on (a) love and (b) pastrami. In the same way that people say you never really know a person until you fight them, perhaps [...]